The Seiko SNAB71: The Flight Master is famous by its nickname

A very beautiful watch! It’s tough not to step on the gas while cruising through the labyrinthine praise highway in this vehicle. It’s a fantastic, top notch quartz movement inside and its face is bordered with a filigree of numbers in two rows, the lower one turning. That gets done almost any calculation related to travelling. That one is its ‘Flight-‘thing and makes it half a pilot’s watch! The three-zone time tracking and a professional chronograph function comprise the other half.

The chronograph is bit different from the way we mostly know it in semi-pro watches and sometimes, even in some professional watches i.e. 1-second counts. Here, Seiko gives you 1/5th. Every second is covered in 5 ticks, just like a mechanical. It’s outstandingly responsive (thanks to the big plate on the pusher) – perhaps – a bit too much. You might have to check following any considerably large bump or knock. Mine has had a couple of instances so far; thankfully, it survived all the nastiness (sewage water and mud; rock under turbid water and some leeches) without a single blemish! It applies even to the leather strap! It paid off feeding the band with leather nourishing cream for three days.

Note: For best results, create a layer of the cream by dipping both sides of the strap into the container till the steel buckles. Pick up and leave it like that for overnight in room temperature. Rub it off the next morning. If you can do it once a week, it’s all the better.

Either the steel doesn’t catch the skin oil or I exude it less and it got to be one. The official feel depends a lot on it and it’s good that it doesn’t need a wipe every day.  Unless the finely crafted details have everything clean over and around them, it wouldn’t have been half as extraordinary as it is.

The dial layout – to me – has the ease and beauty of a mechanical chronograph. The top mini-dial is the minute-register for the chronograph and the seconds sub-dial is at 9’o clock. The lower dial either denotes a second time zone or tracks time for the alarm to ring, which is sharp, sustaining and pleasantly loud. Whether it can wake you up or not is an individual thing. During the daytime, it can be heard clear and loud. You do it by unscrewing and pulling out the 3’o clock crown and also set the second time zone; the other one works the EB-6 rule. The battery is supposed to run for three years with moderate use of the functions.

Reading the date and other lettering are certainly not your thing if you wear fat glasses; to normal vision people, they come precise and pristine.

Three days are enough to learn all the operations. The manual gives it clear and simple.

So, where’s the third time-zone? It’s simple; just remember how many hours it is ahead or behind the second time zone. That’s all!

 

Watch(es) mentioned in this post are listed below. Click to see details and buy them:

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.